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Three Public Star Gazes Scheduled in January

Continue to check this home page as weather could change the venue or postpone and possibly cancel a star gaze. Check-in again after 5:00 p.m. on the afternoon of the observing session for the latest info and update. (Image by club member Alan Davis, taken from Lookout Observatory.)

Thursday, Jan. 16th, 1:30 p.m. update: Unfortunately, a cloudy forecast has caused the cancellation of this weekend’s star gaze at Lookout Observatory.

17 January 2020 – Friday nightThe location for this star gaze will be
Lookout Observatory on the UNC Asheville campus, with a weather backup date of
Saturday, 18 January. While the event is free and open to the general public
, pre-registration is required to attend. To learn more about how to register, please visit the UNCA Lookout Observatory website here. Sunset occurs at 5:42 p.m., with shuttle service beginning at 6:30 p.m.

24 January 2020 – Friday nightThis public star gaze will be held at
Grassland Mountain Observatory in Madison County, with a weather backup night of
Saturday, 25 January. This event is free and open to the general public —
registration is not necessary to attend. A temporary gate code, required for entry, will be provided on the day of the star gaze by 4:00 p.m. Directions to Grassland Mountain Observatory can be found here. Sunset occurs at 5:49 p.m.

31 January 2020 – Friday nightThe location for this star gaze will be
Lookout Observatory on the UNC Asheville campus, with a weather backup date of
Saturday, 1 February. While the event is free and open to the general public
, pre-registration is required to attend. To learn more about how to register, please visit the UNCA Lookout Observatory website here. Sunset occurs at 5:56 p.m., with shuttle service beginning at 7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.

19 – 24 January 2020 – Six Bright International Space Station Flyovers Visible in our Region
Find out more…

26 – 28 January 2020
The Waxing Crescent Moon Joins Mercury and Venus at Dusk

Image courtesy of Sky & Telescope

27 January 2020
The Planets Venus and Neptune Appear to Pass Very Closely in the Dark

Image created using SkySafari
software app

6 February 2020 – Next Indoor Meeting

Thursday night, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. – In the Reuter Center’s Manheimer Room, located on the UNC Asheville campus. The meeting is free and open to the general public.

Astrobiology: One group’s search for the chemical signatures of life on Earth and beyond – presented by Amanda Stockton, Ph.D.,
Georgia Tech

Highly sensitive organic analysis is key to understanding the processes that shape an extraterrestrial location, its potential habitability, and whether it could host life presently or in the past. However, some extraterrestrial locations, like those of the surface of icy moons, are challenging to access with a soft lander, making high-impact kinetic penetrators an attractive mission platform. Read more…