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17-18 October 2018The Moon Flips for Mars

 

 

Image courtesy of Sky & Telescope

 

19-22 October 2018Find the Elusive Zodiacal Light in Dawn Skies

Saturday, 20 October 2018

International Observe the Moon Night

Continue to check this home page as weather and road conditions could change the venue or and possibly cancel the event. Check-in again after 5:00 p.m. on the afternoon of the observing session for the latest info and update.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come join the Astronomy Club of Asheville as we celebrate International Observe the Moon Night on Saturday evening, October 20th. Take a look at our Earth’s only natural satellite – the Moon – through telescopes and get a close up view of an object that has mesmerized and enchanted people (and animals) for thousands of years! The event is free and open to the general public.

Club members with telescopes will be on hand at the Tanbark Ridge Overlook off the Blue Ridge Parkway, located 5 miles north of the Folk Art Center and just 20 minutes from downtown Asheville. Directions to Tanbark Ridge can be found here.

For more information about this global event, visit this NASA website.

 

21 October 2018Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks

 

Image courtesy of Sky & Telescope

 

 

1 November 2018 – Next Indoor Meeting

Thursday night, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. – In the Manheimer Room at the lower level of the Reuter Center on the UNC Asheville campus. This meeting is free and open to the general public.

“How Big is a Black Hole?” presented by Stephen Danford, UNC Greensboro

 

 

 

As the famed British geneticist J.B.S. Haldane once said, “The Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.” Never was this truer than in the case of black holes. First predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916 and discovered in 1971, these incredibly dense regions in the fabric of space-time are formed in the death throes of super massive stars – giant stellar structures collapsing under their own gravity and compressing enormous matter into a small area. Black holes possess the mass of a dozen Suns, squeezed into the size of New York City, and whose gravity is so strong that not even light can escape. Read more…

Two Star Gazes in November

 

Continue to check this home page as weather and road conditions could change the venue or postpone and possibly cancel a star gaze. Check-in again after 5:00 p.m. on the afternoon of the observing session for the latest info and update. (image credit: Spencer Black, taken at Grassland Mountain Observatory)

2 November 2018 – Friday night – The location for this star gaze will be Grassland Mountain Observatory in Madison County.  The weather backup night is Saturday, November 3rd.  This event is free and open to the general public — registration is not necessary to attend.  A temporary gate code, required for entry, will be posted on this club website home page by 5:00 p.m. on the day of the star gaze.  Directions to Grassland Mountain Observatory can be found here.  Sunset occurs at 6:34 p.m.

9 November 2018 – Friday night – The location for this star gaze will be Lookout Observatory on the UNC Asheville campus. The weather backup date is Saturday, November 10th. While the event is free and open to the general public, pre-registration is required to attend. To learn more about how to register, please visit the UNCA Lookout Observatory website here. Sunset occurs at 5:28 p.m., with shuttle service beginning at 6:00.